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Free Virtual Workshop Spots for BIPOC folks

Steve Leroux

We're excited to start offering a handful of free spots in our upcoming virtual workshops to folks who self-identify as black, indigenous, or a person of color. These spots are limited, and we'll be giving them out on a first-come, first-served basis. If you're interested, send us an email and tell us which workshop(s) you're interested in.

"Saltstone Ceramics is a place where everyone is welcomed to discover a valuable connection with a creative working community."

That's our mission statement, and we work hard to bring it to life in our studio and in the online community we cultivate. But when we look at the folks who are actually represented in our gallery, in our student body, and in our community at large, it's clear that some people are drastically under-represented. And we want to make sure they also feel welcome.

These free spots for BIPOC students are just one of the ways we're putting into practice the commitments we've made to our community.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do all BIPOC students get in for free? No, we're only offering a very limited number of free spots for each virtual workshop, typically just one.

Can non-BIPOC folks still sign up for classes? Yes! Other than some age limitations, anyone can sign up for any of our classes. All we're doing is offering a few free classes to encourage more diversity in our student body.

How do I sign up? Just get in touch via email or through our contact form. Tell us which workshop(s) you're interested in. Spaces are very limited.

Do I need proof of my BIPOC identity? No, that would be... problematic. We'll take your word for it.

Do you have a waitlist? Currently, no. If you're interested, you'll need to send us a new email when we post new classes.

Will you offer free spots when you resume in-person classes? We haven't figured out our plans here yet. Our in-studio resources are much more limited than what we can offer through virtual workshops. We hope we'll be able to, but right now we're focused on riding out the pandemic.

Are you offering free spots for non-BIPOC folks? No. The vast majority of our students are not black, indigenous, or a person of color. We don't think this particular demographic needs representational encouragement.

Isn't this racist? Good question! Some people think affirmative action policies are racist. But most folks acknowledge that affirmative action is actually anti-racistWe're in the latter camp, obviously. One of the ironies of anti-racist work is that you can't fix racism, and in particular the systemic inequalities organized around race, by being blind to race.

Our students benefit by being exposed to a wide variety of styles, talents, techniques and skill levels... and a wide variety of backgrounds and identities. We want to do what we can to make everyone feel welcome in our (virtual) classroom.

This policy doesn't make me feel welcome! Wait, this isn't a question. But okay: everyone is welcome. But not every attitude. If your actions are racist, or sexist, or homophobic, or anti-trans, or you're just an asshole, we'll ask you to take your attitude somewhere else. We'll be here when you're ready to come back with a different attitude.

Remember that we're a privately-owned business that is attempting to do good work for the local and national ceramics community while also staying afloat during a global pandemic. If you don't like our choices, we encourage you to open your own ceramics studio. The more, the merrier!

 


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